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1870 Harpers Weekly Indian Chiefs + Pres. Grant

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1870 Harpers Weekly Indian Chiefs + Pres. Grant
Item Details
Description
Post Civil War
Native American Indian Chiefs Meet With President Grant
June 18, 1870-Dated, "Harper's Weekly," 16 pages, Complete Issue, Illustrated, Choice Extremely Fine.
Impressive cover artwork shows an engraving of President Grant greeting Native American Indian Chiefs Red Cloud, Spotted Tail, and Swift Bear, a Peace Pipe Tomahawk shown laid down on the floor, with the caption below reading, "Let Us Have Peace." Initials "C.S.R." as the engraver in the lower right corner, disbound. Also, captioned above begins and article plus an interior full horizontal page of "Indians on the War Path."
Harper's Weekly, A Journal of Civilization was an American political magazine based in New York City. Published by Harper & Brothers from 1857 until 1916, it featured foreign and domestic news, fiction, essays on many subjects, and humor, alongside illustrations. It carried extensive coverage of the American Civil War, including many illustrations of events from the war. During its most influential period, it was the forum of the political cartoonist Thomas Nast.
In 1857, his company began publishing Harper's Weekly in New York City. By 1860 the circulation of the Weekly had reached 200,000. Illustrations were an important part of the Weekly's content, and it developed a reputation for using some of the most renowned illustrators of the time, notably Winslow Homer, Granville Perkins and Livingston Hopkins.
Among the recurring features were the political cartoons of Thomas Nast, who was recruited in 1862 and worked with the Weekly for more than 20 years. Nast was a feared caricaturist, and is often called the father of American political cartooning.
He was the first to use an elephant as the symbol of the Republican Party. He also drew the legendary character of Santa Claus; his version became strongly associated with the figure, who was popularized as part of Christmas customs in the late nineteenth century.
KEYWORDS:
Indian Treaty, American Indian History, Indian Wars, Printed Illustration Artwork, Militaria

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1870 Harpers Weekly Indian Chiefs + Pres. Grant

Estimate $180 - $240
Jun 11, 2022
See Sold Price
Starting Price $120
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Ships from Rancho Santa Fe, CA, United States
Early American History Auctions
Early American History AuctionsRancho Santa Fe, CA, United States
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0240: 1870 Harpers Weekly Indian Chiefs + Pres. Grant
Sold for $1501 Bid
Est. $180 - $240Starting Price $120
Autographs - Political - Americana - Maps
Jun 11, 2022 12:00 PM EDT
Buyer's Premium 30%
Lot 0240 Details
Description
...
Post Civil War
Native American Indian Chiefs Meet With President Grant
June 18, 1870-Dated, "Harper's Weekly," 16 pages, Complete Issue, Illustrated, Choice Extremely Fine.
Impressive cover artwork shows an engraving of President Grant greeting Native American Indian Chiefs Red Cloud, Spotted Tail, and Swift Bear, a Peace Pipe Tomahawk shown laid down on the floor, with the caption below reading, "Let Us Have Peace." Initials "C.S.R." as the engraver in the lower right corner, disbound. Also, captioned above begins and article plus an interior full horizontal page of "Indians on the War Path."
Harper's Weekly, A Journal of Civilization was an American political magazine based in New York City. Published by Harper & Brothers from 1857 until 1916, it featured foreign and domestic news, fiction, essays on many subjects, and humor, alongside illustrations. It carried extensive coverage of the American Civil War, including many illustrations of events from the war. During its most influential period, it was the forum of the political cartoonist Thomas Nast.
In 1857, his company began publishing Harper's Weekly in New York City. By 1860 the circulation of the Weekly had reached 200,000. Illustrations were an important part of the Weekly's content, and it developed a reputation for using some of the most renowned illustrators of the time, notably Winslow Homer, Granville Perkins and Livingston Hopkins.
Among the recurring features were the political cartoons of Thomas Nast, who was recruited in 1862 and worked with the Weekly for more than 20 years. Nast was a feared caricaturist, and is often called the father of American political cartooning.
He was the first to use an elephant as the symbol of the Republican Party. He also drew the legendary character of Santa Claus; his version became strongly associated with the figure, who was popularized as part of Christmas customs in the late nineteenth century.
KEYWORDS:
Indian Treaty, American Indian History, Indian Wars, Printed Illustration Artwork, Militaria

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